Abstract


INTRODUCTION
Bile acids (BA) are complex signalling molecules that, in addition to their classical roles as hepatobiliary facilitators of metabolite excretion and absorption of lipophilic nutrients, have a potential role in insulin resistance and obesity, though the exact mechanism remains elusive. We hypothesised that BA concentration is increased in obesity and/or insulin resistance.

view more

INTRODUCTION
Bile acids (BA) are complex signalling molecules that, in addition to their classical roles as hepatobiliary facilitators of metabolite excretion and absorption of lipophilic nutrients, have a potential role in insulin resistance and obesity, though the exact mechanism remains elusive. We hypothesised that BA concentration is increased in obesity and/or insulin resistance.

METHODS
Seventy-one adult volunteers formed four groups based on BMI, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and a 75-g OGTT: lean insulin-sensitive (BMI≤25 kg/m2, HOMA-IR<2.0, n=19), overweight/obese insulin-sensitive non-diabetic (Obsen, BMI>25 kg/m2, HOMA-IR<1.5, n=11), overweight/obese insulin-resistant (Obres, BMI>25 kg/m2, HOMA-IR>3.0, n=20) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, n=21). We measured insulin sensitivity (glucose disposal rate [GDR]/fat-free mass [FFM]) by hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp, body composition/central abdominal fat by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, visceral fat area by computed tomography and fasting insulin, adiponectin and BA.

RESULTS
In group comparisons, GDR/FFM was significantly lower, and visceral and liver fat significantly higher, in Obres compared to lean and Obsen subjects, despite similar total adiposity in Obres and Obsen (data not shown). Total BA concentration was higher in Obres (1.35 ± 1.1 mmol/L, P=0.04) and in T2DM (1.26 ± 0.85 mmol/L, P=0.0004) versus Obsen (0.67 ± 0.28 mmol/L), but were similar between Obsen and lean (1.00 ± 0.69 mmol/L). The primary (cholic acid, CA; chenodeoxycholic, CDCA) and secondary (deoxycholic acid, DA) bile acids were significantly associated with waist circumference (CA, R=0.34, P=0.003; CDCA, R=0.26, P=0.03; DA, R=0.37, P=0.001) and central abdominal fat (% or kg) (CA, R=0.28, P=0.01; CDCA, R=0.24, P=0.04; DA, R=0.29, P=0.01). Only CA was associated with BMI (R=0.25, P=0.03), visceral fat (R=0.24, P=0.04) and liver density (an inverse marker of hepatic fat, r=-0.26, p=0.03). In addition, DA was negatively associated with GDR/FFM (R=-0.43, P=0.0002) and adiponectin levels (R=-0.34, P=0.004).

CONCLUSION
Our data suggest that BA concentrations correlated with insulin resistance and its markers, including central abdominal, visceral and liver fat in humans. Whether BA play an aetiolgoical role in insulin resistance is yet to be elucidated.

show less

Support our sponsors


Share this PosterTalk

About PosterTalks

PosterTalks allows meeting attendees the ability to view these presentations, download or bookmark their favorite presentations, download PDF versions of the posters, ask questions, leave comments, and share presentations with their colleagues – all from the convenience of a smart phone.

Contact Us

Have a question? Click here to contact us. Need technical support? Click here to email support.

© 2018 PosterTalks and Connect BioMed. All other content and data, including data entered into this website are copyrighted by their respective owners.