Abstract


Objective: We and others have observed that compared to age-matched controls, young girls who have a first-degree relative with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) display reduced insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function and insulin-mediated suppression of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). The objective of our study was thus to assess whether the differences in these metabolic parameters observed during puberty between at-risk girls and controls persist after five years. view more

Objective: We and others have observed that compared to age-matched controls, young girls who have a first-degree relative with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) display reduced insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function and insulin-mediated suppression of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). The objective of our study was thus to assess whether the differences in these metabolic parameters observed during puberty between at-risk girls and controls persist after five years.
Methods: We compared 8 first-degree relatives to a woman with PCOS, either mother or sister (PCOSr), to 8 age-matched girls unrelated to PCOS, at baseline (8-14 y.o.) and at follow-up between 4 to 6 years later (13-21 y.o.). Evaluation visits included anthropometric measures, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSivGTT). We derived from the FSivGTT: insulin sensitivity index (SI), beta cell function (disposition index, DIFSivGTT) and indices of insulin-mediated suppression of NEFA, namely Logn-linear slope of NEFA and T50 of NEFA suppression. We calculated from the OGTT: insulin sensitivity index (ISIMatsuda) and an index of beta-cell function (DIOGTT = ISIMatsuda × CIR30). Data are presented as medians and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare groups or time periods.
Results: After a follow-up of 5.4 years (similar between groups, p=0.84), participants had a mean age of 17.3 years (13.2-21.3). Tanner stages at follow-up were similar between groups (5 vs 5, p=0.06). At baseline, all metabolic parameters were worse in PCOSr when compared to controls, as previously published (Trottier A. et al, 2012). After 5 years, all differences in metabolic parameters disappeared, such as indices from the FSivGTT: SI=3.2 vs 3.4 (PCOSr vs controls, p=0.88), DIFSivGTT =1926 vs 1380 (p=0.44), Logn-linear slope of NEFA suppression (‑0.032 vs ‑0.032, p=0.88) and T50 of NEFA suppression (18.1 vs 20.8 min, p=0.057). Likewise, results from the OGTT were similar between groups at follow-up: ISIMatsuda= 3.8 vs 3.6 (p=0.80) and DIOGTT=4,36 vs 2,74 (p=0.20). Metabolic parameters were relatively stable in PCOSr over 5 years (p>0.05 for difference with time), but deteriorated significantly in control girls (all p<0.05 for difference with time), except for Logn-linear slope of NEFA. BMI-z and waist circumference-to-height ratio did not change significantly with time within both groups (all p>0.05).
Conclusion: In summary, our study demonstrates that metabolic deterioration observed during puberty in girls genetically predisposed to PCOS remains stable over 5 years, but control girls reach similar metabolic control than predisposed PCOS girls after puberty. Girls at risk of PCOS may thus display early but transient metabolic deterioration during puberty, which would therefore represent a window of transient metabolic alterations in these girls.

show less
Files:

Share this PosterTalk

About PosterTalks

PosterTalks allows meeting attendees the ability to view these presentations, download or bookmark their favorite presentations, download PDF versions of the posters, ask questions, leave comments, and share presentations with their colleagues – all from the convenience of a smart phone.

Contact Us

Have a question? Click here to contact us. Need technical support? Click here to email support.

© 2018 PosterTalks and Connect BioMed. All other content and data, including data entered into this website are copyrighted by their respective owners.