Abstract: P-033

The Poor Quality of Women’s Sleep Negatively Influences Fertilization Rates in Assisted Reproductive Technology.

Presenter: Satomi Akamatsu


Abstract


OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to explore the association between the quality of women’s sleep and outcomes in assisted reproductive technology
DESIGN: A questionnaire survey study view more

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to explore the association between the quality of women’s sleep and outcomes in assisted reproductive technology
DESIGN: A questionnaire survey study
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey questionnaire was conducted during June and July 2016, involving 208 patients, who had undergone Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) treatment and consented to fill out a questionnaire. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) ranging from level 0 to 21 was used to evaluate quality of sleep, by measuring subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medication, and any related daytime dysfunction during the previous month. The questionnaire also included questions regarding their duration of infertility, sensitivity to cold (especially in the extremities, such as feet and hands), job classification such as full-time, part-time or shift-work, and occasional and/or moderate alcohol consumption. The PSQI was divided into three categories: a total score of “5” or less indicated no sleep difficulties; “6-8” indicated mild difficulties; “9” or more indicated severe difficulties. Based on the collected responses to the above questions, a statistical comparison of ART outcomes, in three PSQI categories, was performed by Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was subsequently conducted to assess the association of the conditions in the questions with ART outcomes, as represented by fertilization rates per ovum pick-up and blastocyst development rates.
RESULTS: The percentage of patients with a total score of “5” or less (Group A) was 65.1% (136/209), with a total score of “6-8” (Group B) was 26.8% (56/209), and a total score of “9” or more (Group C) was 8.1% (17/209). Fertilization rates among the retrieved oocytes in Groups A, B and C were 67.1%, 63.1% and 48.6% respectively and a statistically significant association between PSQI categories and fertilization rates was detected (p=0.0018). Blastocyst development rates among the fertilized oocytes in Groups A, B and C were 62.9%, 57.1% and 48.4% respectively. The statistical difference of p=0.087 narrowly missed a technical classification of statistically significant. Logistic regression analysis identified that a lifestyle PSQI score of ‘5’ or less and occasional and/or moderate alcohol consumption were significant predictors of successful fertilization.
CONCLUSIONS: Our survey questionnaire found that a low quality of sleep has a negative impact on fertilization rates. Good sleep patterns can be one of the important daily habits for patients to improve their response to fertility treatments and increase their chances of pregnancy. Interestingly, occasional and/or moderate alcohol consumption had a positive impact on fertilization. This may be due to the beneficial effects of a moderate amount of alcohol, such as stress-relief and sleep-induction.

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