Abstract


OBJECTIVE: The psychological burden of IVF is one of the most common reasons for treatment discontinuation. Multiple failed IVF cycles has been shown to worsen anxiety and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, prior research has demonstrated negative effects of stress on IVF outcomes. Our pilot project revealed that participation in a six-week structured yoga intervention decreased stress levels in infertility patients compared to non-participators (controls). view more

OBJECTIVE: The psychological burden of IVF is one of the most common reasons for treatment discontinuation. Multiple failed IVF cycles has been shown to worsen anxiety and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, prior research has demonstrated negative effects of stress on IVF outcomes. Our pilot project revealed that participation in a six-week structured yoga intervention decreased stress levels in infertility patients compared to non-participators (controls). This study sought to determine whether an online yoga intervention is equally as efficacious as an in-person yoga session at reducing stress levels in patients with a history of IVF failure.
DESIGN: Prospective cohort study
MATERIALS AND METHODS: IRB approval was obtained. Patients with at least one failed IVF cycle or a miscarriage after a successful cycle were recruited from a large infertility private practice. Demographic information was collected. Participants were allowed to self enroll in either an in-person yoga intervention (90-minute fertility yoga class and discussion session once a week for six weeks) or an online yoga intervention (DVD instructed yoga class coupled with a 45-minute online webinar once a week for six weeks). Participation in five out of the six classes was required to be eligible for analysis. Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was completed immediately before and after the intervention and the mean scores were compared at each timepoint for both groups. Demographic data was compared using paired T-tests. Anxiety index scores were analyzed with contingency tables and repeated measures analysis of variance.
RESULTS: Twenty-six patients completed both pre and post intervention surveys (19 in-person participants, 7 online participants). Demographics were not significantly different between the two intervention groups. When comparing the two interventions, there was no significant difference in mean state or trait anxiety scores for either survey timepoint. There was a significant decrease in state and trait anxiety scores from pre-test to post-test for both of the interventions (State: Pre-test 47.00 ± 10.61, Post-test 35.81 ± 11.48 F=27.13, df=[1,24], p<0.001; Trait: Pre-test 44.31 ± 11.89, Post-test 37.23 ± 10.05 F=5.76, df=[1,24], p=0.025).
CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary analysis demonstrates a significant reduction in anxiety scores for both yoga interventions. No difference was noted between the groups which furthers the idea that an online intervention could be of equal benefit to an in-person session. Recruitment for this study is ongoing. Subsequent data analysis will function to strengthen the statistical impact of these results, specifically in the online group. Overall, these findings show a promising benefit of implementing either an in-person or online yoga program for anxiety reduction in patients with prior failed IVF cycles.

show less
Files:

Share this PosterTalk

About PosterTalks

PosterTalks allows meeting attendees the ability to view these presentations, download or bookmark their favorite presentations, download PDF versions of the posters, ask questions, leave comments, and share presentations with their colleagues – all from the convenience of a smart phone.

Contact Us

Have a question? Click here to contact us. Need technical support? Click here to email support.

© 2017 PosterTalks and Connect BioMed. All other content and data, including data entered into this website are copyrighted by their respective owners.